Women narratives: the life of a refugee

June 11, 2012

WCRP: Her alias is Naw La Marn and she is 31 years old. She has two sons (nine and twelve) and a six-year-old daughter. She grew up in the village of Kyaut Pyat in Kawkareik Township, Karen State, where she worked on a farm in her youth. But when Naw La Marn was 14, her family left home and never returned. When she married at age 18, the wedding was held in a refugee camp. Read more

Male and Female Porters and Human Shields at Burma’s Frontline

August 2, 2011


Story of male porters

“They kicked and punched my back and face, leaving my nose bleeding. Sobbingly, I apologized and explained that even though I’m wearing a soldier’s vest, it does not mean I’m a Karen rebel soldier. But they never stopped kicking my back,” said Saw Kyaw Tho.

Saw Kyaw Tho is a 41-year-old Karen man, living in Ah Pa-lon village, Kya-inn-seikyi Township, Karen State. He farms and cuts broom grasses for a living.
The outbreak of post-election fighting between Burmese government troops and the Breakaway DKBA Brigade 5 has led to many local residents in Kya-inn-seikyi Township being forced to serve as porters and human shields for the government troops. Read more

The other side of working in a food stall

July 19, 2011


“I work this job because I am poor, not because I enjoy it or have a choice in the matter” said Yu Yu Khaing (alias).

Yu Yu Khaing is 19 years old and she lives in Zin Kyait village, Mon State. She is Burmese and there are three siblings in her family. Yu Yu Khaing works in a food stall since it was originally built. She earns a basic salary of 15,000 Kyat per month working in the food stall. For extra income Yu Yu Khaing sells soft drinks as a waitress and earns another 100,000 Kyat per month on top of her basic income. Yu Yu Khaing spends 150, 000 Kyat to support and feed her family every month and the remaining spending money is between 20-30,000 Kyat. Read more

HIV child hopes for the future

July 16, 2010

Chan Chan, WCRP

“I don’t want to take a lot of medicine. It is very boring. I just want to be the same as the other children. They don’t have to take medicine like me,” said Mi Saw, a Mon child who lives in the Safe House run by the Thailand-Burma Border Consortium (TBBC), near Huay Malai in Kanchnaburi province, Thailand.

Mi Saw* is 13-years-old and HIV positive. She lived in Halockanee, an Internally Displaced Person’s (IDP) resettlement site, on the Burmese side of the Thai-Burma border with her mother and father before moving to the Safe House. Her parents were diagnosed with AIDS when she was 5-years-old. Her mother died first and Mi Saw was left to care for her ailing father. Read more

Fleeing Prying Eyes; A Mothers Search for Safety

June 16, 2010

WCRP: Mi Cho*, a 40-year-old Mon woman, was born, married and gave birth to her six children in Alaesakhan village, Yebu Township, Tenasserim Division, southern Burma, however, because of increased instability throughout Mon state, she was forced to migrate to an Internally Displaced Person (IDP) area near the border of Thailand. Read more

A mother’s fears realized

March 23, 2010

WCRP: “I don’t want to return until I have earned enough money to start a shop for my family in my hometown,” said Mi Yi, a Mon woman from Kaw-kha-lein village, Kyaikmayaw Township, Mon State, southern Burma. Read more

A home for the unwanted

March 12, 2010

WCRP: “I want to go back home. Can you take me?” a mentally challenged woman asked me while my friend and I were visiting the Safe House near Huay Malai in Kanchnaburi province, Thailand. But for this woman, and many of her fellow patients, the Safe House serves as the only “home” such individuals can find. Read more

The child’s life, hopeless in the future

February 18, 2010

WCRP: Early in the morning I was awoken by the chickens beautiful singing. I opened my eyes and looked around my room. Through the window I could see the mist falling to the earth in small droplets and my neighbors cooking rice or praying to the monks. Read more

Can I eat today?

January 20, 2010

WCRP: “I really would like to go to school instead of working. I get very upset when I see my friends going to school. I would like to be happy with them,” said 12-year-old Ma Larn Zar Me as she searched the street for empty water bottles. Read more

The Difficulties of Migrant Women

December 17, 2009

WCRP: In January 2007, 17-year-old Ma Than and her best friend Ma Cho, 18-years-old, left Khaya village, Pa-an Township, Karen State, Burma, and travelled to Mahachai Thailand. In hopes of earning better wages and providing for their families, the girls and 3 friends arranged the trip with a local broker. The broker promised them prosperous jobs and charged each 450,000 kyat for travel costs. Read more

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